You Can Call Me Dr. TechnoModeration

You Can Call Me Dr. TechnoModeration

Are you sick of working 60 hours a week, going to a restaurant and constantly seeing folks dining yet texting at the same time at the table? Maybe you believe that resting once in a while without being ostracized for being human by others is a normal activity? I certainly believe that. By the way, you can believe that too.

We are living in a very stressful world and frankly, I feel that the main reason we are so stressed out is because of being exposed to a ridiculously amount of technology every day, all day long. Have you thought to yourself, “Why are we doing this to ourselves?” “Is technology use all that important?” 

What is crazy about this whole conversation, to me at least, is that extreme uses of technology can in fact be quite detrimental to you and me yet we are celebrating its uncontrolled advancements if there isn’t a tomorrow. Do you now that unplugging from the machine can reduce feelings of jealousy? Do you now that 1 in 3 people feel worse by going to Facebook? What if I told you that most people probably go to social media when they are sad or bored?

What the heck is going on! Are we going mad? No, maybe we just don’t realize that technology is perhaps controlling our lives and turning us into technology itself! We must TechnoModerate. I am Mister TechnoModeration.

I feel pretty proud to say this publicly.

If you are from the position that technology should be used in moderation in society… Join the team, pay attention, investigate and disconnect once in a while. Get in touch with me! I would love to hear from you.

Why lose your life for the sake of technology, I say? It ain’t worth it, that’s for sure. Thoughts?

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We Live In A Society Driven By Technology

We Live In A Society Driven By Technology

We live in a society driven by technology. We see technology being used in churches, education, medicine, music, in banks, you name it. There is no question that people benefit from advancements in technology, including me. However, why are we so shy to talk about the flip side of technology? I tell you this, ladies and gentleman. The side effects of technology are many! We find the other side of technology when analyzing unemployment due to automation, the real cost of creating a successful social media campaign, or the unknown side effects of virtual reality systems. Churches are struggling to attract millennials and when we see them there, they are often texting. There are industries being pushed out of business due to what I like to call, “TechMania.” What a tragedy!

Artificial intelligence is a reality now. Fedora, the Russian robot that can shot a gun and drive a car is real. On-line bullying is still a big problem in America. Kids now are committing suicide at record levels. We are experiencing a wave of anxiety among our people to a level that we have never seen. We are now all tech gladiators.

Can you believe that kids these days are starting to have a difficult time reading non-verbal behaviors? Thank goodness we can still build influence off-line. Bots can now help writers like me to create stories for media consumption. Net bias is now a reality in the United States. We have no other way but to pay attention to the extreme views and opinions often generated by technology. This is the world we live in.

Be aware ladies and gents. Questions?

Academia Can’t Afford TechnoHitlers Or TechnoPhobics Anymore

Academia Can’t Afford TechnoHitlers Or TechnoPhobics Anymore

Academia can’t afford TechnoHitlers and/or TechnoPhobics anymore. As operating budgets are being cut and the need for recruiting and to to give good student treatment increases, so is the need to TechnoModerate. The need to educate students with technology yet maintaining an acceptable level of emphatic communication behavior is indeed a pressing need in 21st century American education.

Professors who are anti-technology and believe that technology shouldn’t be implemented in schools might as well change their careers or simply retire. It would be a disservice to students and a poor allocation of both private and state funds to keep faculty members who are either knowingly incompetent or unwilling to adopt technique in their courses.  We don’t live in 1991 anymore, people. We live in the age where the Pads reign, where learning management systems can and indeed do make our lives easier (as long as they work)… a time in history where students can work at their own pace out of the classroom yet acquiring a college education. The new media revolution is here to stay. Embrace it or you will be left behind.

Wait a minute, TechnoHitlers. This doesn’t mean that we should replace faculty with machines, do whatever is required to make all our courses as technologically advanced as possible at all costs, or discourage anyone to deviate from printing a document on paper. This is unwise as good human communication not only help to recruit students — it is also critical to keep them! Communication is key! Empathy is key! How much technology one needs to use in order to be empathetic, by the way?

One more things technoHitlers… It is a not a good idea to impose technology use on anyone as too much technology can in fact backfire on you and cause eye strain, technostress, and in some causes clinical depression or anxiety. So, let me ask you this — How good is the “Let’s use technology at all costs” if your faculty members now have more medical problems to deal with due to technique?  Isn’t that going to make university’s health insurance higher? Do professors are more productive when they are healthy or sick? You might be saying — Yes but who needs professors if we have technology? Let me answer this question to you publicly. 1) Students. When students are passing though difficult times, they want to speak with an empathetic faculty member. 2) The university. Governance can’t be don without people. 3) Your stakeholders. Without faculty and staff, your town deteriorates. Don’t believe me? Take a look at Flint Michigan. Do you want more? Do you see TechnoHitlers, your extreme ideology is as toxic as the ideology of the TechnoPhobics.   

STOP TechnoPhobics tenured faculty members! Don’t come to me and say, “But hey, I am tenured and I have the academic freedom to do whatever I like in my classroom.” Hmmm… TechnoPhobic, you have all the rights to believe in whatever you like but you won’t work in a department I chair for too long. In fact, I bet you won’t last too long in the profession because in academia, especially these days, we are to do what is best for the students not necessarily what is best for you. Remember, a department without students isn’t a department. Avoiding technology is not only a mistake but a death sentence to any PhD these days. Adopt some or get out.

What is my proposal? As I always say, “Use Technology but in moderation. Be a TechnoModerator!” Embrace technology with reason. Why not use a Content Management System to help teach your classes? Of course this assumes that the tool you are given works. If your organization is having issues with it, create your own system. The former is too good of a technique to be ignored.  Develop tutorials, podcasts perhaps. These are overall good and moderate use of technology in the classroom. Don’t require all students to use everything “technology.” Some students read better on paper. Give them the option to read the course content on paper. Adopt socratic methods to help students to think critically. Ask students to work in groups and solve problems with a paper and pencil in their hands to help them to use group thinking as a means to produce once in a while. Encourage interpersonal communication in class!  Don’t make all the assignments dependent on using technology! Make some but not all. Moderation people. Is it that complicated to understand?

An Alternative To Smartphone Mania

An Alternative To Smartphone Mania

Today, I did what I always do. I used computer technology in moderation and enjoyed life. Was it complicated or difficult to do? Not really. If was quite easy, in fact. The good news is that you can do the same thing, if you wish, as well. You don’t need to be a slave to smartphone technology or anything electronic. What you need to do is to take control of your life and make the machine work for you rather than the opposite. Yeah right! You might be saying. You maybe be even saying, “This is good on paper but how should I do it? ” Let me share with you how. Are you ready? Here we go.

First, you need to change your mindset in regards to technology. Nobody should live life thinking technology is more than what it really is — technique. Believing that technology transcends its definition and application will result in dependency and could eventually result in you loosing control of technique overtime. Human communication is anthroposemiotics, or the study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation done by a human being. Some of these signs and symbols can be interpreted by a human being when using emoticons or abbreviated TXT messages via computer mediated communication. I think that the current state of affairs of our society has proven that one can indeed communicate using modern social media platforms. I do it, you do it, and in fact, most people do it. But just because we do it doesn’t mean technology is a panacea to all of our problems.

However, just because we can exchange symbols via a Facebook newsfeed or chatroom with our smartphones doesn’t mean that this kind of communication should replace thousands of years of interpersonal communication evolution within the human species. Interpersonal communication helps the human species to connect emotionally and create relationships. You should engage in as much face-to-face interactions as you do on-line. Why? Because if you don’t, I bet you are going to get very sick — mentally sick.  You and I were not wired to live in isolation. SO, stop thinking that smartphone can fully replace human things well. Technique might replace labor but there will be serious consequences in the living system in which technique exists, if that occurs long term.

Second, use technology wisely and if it makes your life better. If technology starts making your life worse, stop using it immediately. Let me illustrate this point — I am a professional photographer who is constantly capturing and editing stills for profit. Modern photography technology helps me tremendously with capturing great shots, editing my photos, storing and selling them. In fact, it helps me considerably, I must add. There is no question about that. I have learned that when I edit photograph for about an hour or so, my eyes and neck start hurting pretty bad. This is precisely why I don’t work in front of the computer for more than 30 minutes at a time. I came to realize that overuse of technology will make your life worse.

Suggestion: Every 30 minutes of computer/smartphone use, get away from the machine! Go get coffee or chat with someone. Get away from the smartphone on a regular basis.

Lastly, make an effort to get out of the machine and visit the outdoors. There is something magical about going for a walk in the woods, I have to tell you. Just make sure that you don’t use your smartphone during your “outdoor walk” activity as this action would then defy the purpose of going into the woods in the first place. Take this opportunity to think and reflect on your daily life and make the adjustments accordingly.  I bet life will be different for you and your dependency on technology would decrease.

The Upcoming Rise Of TechnoGreed In Music

The Upcoming Rise Of TechnoGreed In Music

There is something magical about listening to a live group of church choir singers accompanied by real musicians playing real instruments on a Sunday morning. Their pitches, voice tones and expressions make the experience of listening to them one that everybody should experience at least once in life, especially if there is a bassist, guitarist and drummer near them. From the deep voices of a bass to the upper range of a soprano… along with talented musicians —  Music performances done by people make the machine “look dumb” against the sounds humans can produce together.

The former isn’t, of course, to say that orchestras shouldn’t use any electronic device to record human noise or amplify music instruments played by musicians. Of course we should use technology to record performances and help the audience to hear the musical abilities of the members of the orchestra. However, replacing choir members or musicians with technology doesn’t make too much sense as talent shouldn’t be replaced with technology. In my opinion, replacing singers/musicians with pre-recorded sounds don’t make too much systemic sense. Yet, there are folks who dare otherwise.

What in the world! Are people going mad? This new mindset of cutting human resources at all costs and replacing labor with technology is reaching dangerously absurd levels in American society and to a certain degree — reaching high levels of ridicule and greed. Let me ask you this, “Can your smartphone replace a talented tenor in a church choir? Of course not but that’s obvious. Are pre-recorded music instruments “being played” by a live orchestra elements of a live performance?

The voices (and sounds) of the people are a trademark of what makes us human and there is no technology that will ever replace that. For some of us who believe in Christianity, our voices are also instruments that we use to glorify God. What are people thinking to believe that technology can replace labor in everything in life including music? I know, you know… we know. It is because of money or should I say greed.

Ladies and gentleman… This is TechnoGreed! Let me define this term for you. TechnoGreed, according to technoModerator Luis is  — Definition: The act of using technology to increase one’s level of greediness in music. I know the former terminology is goofy and probably cheesy but at least you can’t say that I am unoriginal.

It will happen — It is coming… it is so predictable. The upcoming rise of TechnoGreed in music is coming to a city near you. Be ready to pay for seeing technology and clapping to robots. What a shame.

The Systemic Impacts Of Automation

The Systemic Impacts Of Automation

Let me ask you an elementary question — What will happen to our country’s infrastructure if we uncontrollably automate our macro systems and ignore our local needs, including our need to hire human beings so they can pay taxes and fix the roads especially here in the city of Jackson, Mississippi. A horrible thing will happen, right? Nothing! And nothing results in more lead in our water systems, more violence in our neighborhoods, drug problems, just to name a few.

Why are folks celebrating this uncontrolled automation at all costs ideology? Why are we cheering for the takeover by robots and artificial intelligence against us? What is so great about having families loosing jobs and being hungry because of technology? Hey you there who is celebrating this whole technology takeover!!! Do you think that robots will put food in your dinner table at night? One thing I do agree — Automated technologies will deliver food to you in the very near future but they won’t be able to pay you a salary. By the way, robots won’t pay taxes. Good luck paying for your public education.

If you think that the city of Jackson in Mississippi is full of holes, wait until the robots take over. The city will be a swiss cheese type of place… It will smell and be full of holes. As soon as that occurs, the people in the city will scream!!! Take these robots out of here! Bring what we have! We need jobs not more automation! Man, I am sounding like a luddite when I am really trying to just simply call for techno moderation. Here is what I really think…

It is impossible to adopt what I call replacing technologies, which I define as technology that replaces people, and and not have a significant systemic impact in the overall infrastructure of a town, small city, metropolis or a megalopolis. The systemic impacts of uncontrolled automation will make your life worse, hands down. How good is automation if it makes our lives worse? It isn’t! Why in the world are we so celebratory about implementing technologies that will make us suffer? You tell me.

Look, it will be a bad day in your neighborhood if you don’t have filtered water and energy. Right now, only Flint Michigan is showing its unintended consequences of automation or should I say the lack thereof and ho it impacted their water system. Automation is fickle, folks. Once they find a cheaper place that accepts their robots for cheaper, they will leave your city faster than a cheetah making your local economy screaming on its knees.  So your city then loses twice. First? Automation takes jobs away. 2) Once the jobs are gone, so is its economy.

Think twice before vowing for uncontrolled automation near you. Who knows, you might be the next unemployed poor human out there screaming for a place to contribute your talents to.

Hippocampus First GPS Second

Hippocampus First  GPS Second

GPS technology is, for the most part, a great tool that we can use in order to find unknown locations in our distant neighborhood or when going out of state to a friend’s or family member’s house for Christmas, thanksgiving, or spring break. There is little doubt that global positioning system technology helps us to find the unknown when we are at the mercy of our own understanding of the environment we are in a more efficiently manner than an old map. It is hard to argue against this undeniable fact.

From this position, GPS technology can serve us quite well. GPS technology should’t be used to guide us to go to the supermarket across the street, the health club across town, or that restaurant we go often in our neighborhoods at the end of the county or to go to work. My reasons are many but they can be mostly summarized in two: Physiological and technological.

The most obvious reason for why we should be careful about using GPS technology to help us to maneuver locally is because of the impact that this technology can can have in our hippocampus functions overtime. The hippocampus  is the organ in our brain that regulates our spacial navigation and memory — long term memory. In order to maneuver through life long term, we are going to need the functions of our Hippocampus to be working at its age capacity. This small but important organ located in the brain’s medial temporal lobe is an important part of our body’s limbic system. It’s connections with our emotions and memories are also at the core of its existence. Therefore, gambling losing important physiological functions of this small but important part of our body for the sake of technology seems irrational and to a degree irresponsible — yet millions of Americans today are dependent on GPS technology to maneuver themselves starting at an early age now. Big mistake, in my opinion.

The least obvious reason for why we should be careful about global positioning systems is ironically technological. Did you notice that sometimes GPS devices provide inefficient routes? Did you also notice that the recommended GPS path to a familiar destination reached before changes quite often every time we ask for the directions again? If you haven’t noticed that, pay close attention to it next time and you will realize that perhaps… GPS technology doesn’t want you to get smart about your surroundings. The question then becomes why! Well, this is rhetorical question in my opinion. Could it be that GPS technology was programmed by someone who is more interested in making a profit on your dumbness than to make you more oriented about your surroundings? GPS systems wouldn’t be sold well if you knew where to go! Think about it.

When I moved my family down South to work at Jackson State University,  I used GPS technology for two weeks in order to find myself around town. The device took me through three different routes every week in order to reach my destination, which drove me completely crazy. All that I wanted was one reliable route to reach my destination. Well, that didn’t happened. It took me a day to write down directions and memorize the path the old school way. Go figure. What is wrong with that method by the way? Nothing wrong.

The Amazon Junction… Shop Local Too

The Amazon Junction… Shop Local Too

Brick and mortar stores are floundering. Badly. Whether it’s a lack of adaptation to change or poor customer service, they are struggling. Let’s be reasonable. Not every store you see is red-lining or looking for government bailouts; however, an unprecedented number of stores are closing. Sears, (don’t panic, as far as I know, Indiana’s isn’t closing), is closing 300 stores, 128 Gamestop stores, 70 Coach stores are also closing, and this is just the tip of the iceberg.

Just because a company closes a brick and mortar store doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t be able to get their product. Companies are investing heavily in the online marketplace. Those online sales have an impact on our local and state taxes.

Think about this, Pennsylvania imposes a use tax to try and make up the deficit left by online sales. This particular tax is a self assessed tax on buyers of items bought out of state. So, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is struggling to collect the sales tax it needs to have a balanced budget.

What does all this mean? It means there are less jobs. It means less revenue for the building owners. It means less local taxes being collected from wages and sales. It means on an average a loss of about 30 jobs per closed store, depending on store size. It means a potential long-term financial hit to Indiana county or any county in the USA.

Indiana seems to be growing quite well by comparison. We just got a Super Shoe, a Salvation Army Thrift Store, a few new small businesses downtown and new stores and restaurants are on the way. This is great news that should be celebrated but what happens if you stop supporting these local businesses and start shopping primarily online?

The side effects of online stores have real life implications that can’t be ignored. I choose Indiana, PA over the mighty world wide web when I used to live there. To me at least, our local businesses create an integral framework that are the building blocks of this community. No one can live on Main St at World Wide Web, USA. Sterling Hills will never be located at Amazon Junction.  

I’m not saying you should never shop online that’s unrealistic. We as a community need to remember that there are implications to making purchases over the internet. You need to support your neighbors, your friends, your local business owners, large and small.

Shopping is inevitable. Online is convenient. Shopping local is necessary. As I always say, “Use technology [shop online] but in moderation.”

Real Versus Fake Books: Paper Books Are Far From Being Dead

Real Versus Fake Books: Paper Books Are Far From Being Dead

Our brain is a wonderful thing. It is adaptable in so many ways, take for instance the difference between reading a “real” book, magazine or newspaper versus a “fake” book. “Fake” books are considered any online material. The brain actually interprets print versus online reading differently. Online reading isn’t absorbed as easily. The brain has a tendency to skim over words focusing on just the important parts of the text. While reading a “real” book, our brains absorb the information, whether fact or fiction, quite easily. This absorption is tested by being able to recall or regurgitate what was just read. As for that skimming skill, when reading a print book our brains have the capacity to weave the tapestry of text into a visual movie inside our heads.

It is known that not everyone has the capacity to visualize what they read; however, I’m going to create a small text tapestry for you to ponder…

As the winter wind blew snowflakes dancing down the street, a little boy wanders clutching a small device to his chest. It’s imperative that he make it to his grandmother’s house. In fact, he can see the warm inviting light beckoning to him only a few houses away. She knows he’s coming. She knows his panic over this small device. And she has the answer. Plus, a surprise.

In his hurry through the snow clogged sidewalk, people bustling around him, he slips. The small device slides across the sidewalk as though it has magically sprouted a miniature snowboard on its underside. The boy watches in mortification, sucking in a cold bitter breath, as the small device, ramps the curb in Olympic fashion, into the street. He gets to his feet and runs, his feet like lead. Before he makes it to the street, a strong hand grabs his arm, almost lifting him off his feet. A car rushes by smashing the small device with an audible crunch.

The boy pulls free of the strong hand, looking both ways, steps out into the street to cradle the small device, now broken, clearly beyond repair. He rushes onward oblivious to shouts and honks towards his grandmother’s house. No longer just inviting but needed so desperately in this emergency.

Sitting at his grandmother’s table, crying over the device, he explains, “Gram. It’s not fair! Now, I’ll never know the ending!”

His grandmother smiles and says soothing, “I know you loved your e-reader. It took you places your parents and I can never afford. But I know what you were reading, and I have a solution.”

Wide eyed, he asks in amazement, “Do you have a new e-reader? It’s so expensive.” The boy knows they don’t have much money. His parents matched the money he was able to save doing odd jobs for the neighbors. It took a long time.

His grandmother lovingly laughs, “No, I don’t. However, in my day, we had libraries with free books anyone could borrow. When our library closed. I went and collected some of the classics. So, I have for you this.”

As she handed him that well worn copy, his breath stopped in his chest. His eyes widened, the tears came just glistening in his eyes to match the snow delicately falling outside. He could finish the story but it was more than that. This story he could feel pages, real pages, between his fingers, smell the faint musty odor. The story literally had weight in his hands. He couldn’t fathom how people could let the gift of a library slip between their fingers but he looked at his book and realized his life’s purpose.

This short story illustrates why we need libraries. It’s not a place for useless books. We shouldn’t let it become a computer lab either. As with much of the new technologies used from smartphones to computers to e-readers, there’s a time and place for everything. But magic happens, new worlds emerge, veils are lifted when books are opened and pages are flipped. Even our brains think print is different and treat it better than online texts.

A Bigger Better Indiana: Don’t Buy On-Line All The Time…

A Bigger Better Indiana: Don’t Buy On-Line All The Time…

In our community, we can buy top-quality shoes, eat at a number of great restaurants, speak with local insurance agents, and even get a massage downtown. That’s wonderful and should be celebrated! What we seem to lack is the ability to effectively develop an internet presence for what businesses have to offer. In reality, this deficiency could lead to disastrous consequences including negatively affecting our local economic growth especially in the areas of sales and economic expansion.

What if I told you that our town’s collective diminutive internet presence could significantly reduce part of the wonderful goods and services we have to offer in Indiana. Possibly, even driving some businesses into closure. In the age of the world wide web, there seems to be a smaller margin for error when it comes to engaging your clientele with your business enterprise.  

In my quest to have a better understanding of the impacts of technology in Indiana county, I decided to have a chat with one of our community’s economic development employees. During an extended discussion, I was pleased to hear that his overall view of technological business use was positive. Within the last two years our community has embraced the idea of businesses having an internet presence (just check out the Indiana Gazette’s online business directory). Some technological backlashes for business owners have occurred and will probably keep occurring into the near future.  Dana puts it eloquently, “Although we have become more technologically oriented as a community, the overall rate of technological change has left some of our community members with unintended nuances… The rapid pace of technological change has left some of our members behind,” states Dana. For a business to develop an internet presence, time is the biggest factor, aside from knowledge of the technology itself, which can really impact the bottom line for many small and local businesses.

We as community members have a call to action! That call is simple. The businesses you frequent, you enjoy, you wish to see triumph in such a precarious economic time, engage with them online. Those businesses are trying to make the community a better place. As the community grows so to will the economy which means a bigger better Indiana for us all to enjoy.

Technology Can’t Replace Media Professionals

Technology Can’t Replace Media Professionals

Technology is no substitute for media professionals.

Let me explain something. Whenever a new technology is introduced in any system, that system is then changed forever because of that technology infusion.

Since the democratization of the camera in smartphones, many people now can take photos as they wish and capture video footage with ease, which is a wonderful thing for many. However, professionals in communication have been affected by these advancements in cellphone technology because now everyone, technically speaking, has “broadcast” capabilities at their fingertips.

I am not saying everyone can now be a professional broadcaster and that photo and video professionals will cease to exist. What I am saying, however, is that many people now can broadcast their lives on social media without having to hire a professional communicator, which has impacted the field of communication forever.

One thing is for sure. The personal media market is gone, for good. See? A small part of what communicators used to offer can now be done without our assistance. You can do them simply by buying a smartphone!

Listen carefully to me and remember the following, compatriots. All these advancements in smartphone technology have had a tremendous impact in how we teach communication these days. The invasive nature of technology in a system, communication included, requires that system to significantly change the way it operates.

Not too many people realize that when an innovation is implemented by a critical mass of people in any society, the affected system often suffers significant consequences because of this new technology implementation. The systems that survive then need to adapt to the realities of the new technology and change accordingly. No technology advancement can be introduced to a system of any kind without fundamentally changing some of its parts.

Remember: Advancements in smartphone technology aren’t free, and this financial aspect will have an impact on what people do in Cleveland! Our community pays a price for not having more video and photo professionals in town.

These professionals of media buy groceries, eat at restaurants, buy houses and spend discretionary income in local shops. I am all for advancements in technology ,as long as people realize that they come with side effects. The field of media has been changed forever because of the smartphone.

I predict that in 10 years or so, most small-town portrait photographers will have a problem staying in business, because of advancements in smartphone camera apps. Only a handful of very talented photo and video professionals will exist in a small town near you! A “great eye” can’t be replaced by a microchip, yet.

Is the democratization of photo and video a problem for communicators? Yes, because many people now think that what we do is obsolete. In fact, nothing can be further from the truth.

The fact Americans can now capture video footage or take photos doesn’t mean they will have quality, or just as importantly, context. Video and audio professionals deserve a job because of what you can’t see.

Pre-production, which is a fancy name for preparation, is an essential part of what media professionals do. Is the average American now going to write scripts and draw storyboards for their productions? I don’t think so.

There is a lot of what we call post-production. Just because a person can capture video footage or take a photograph doesn’t mean that they will be able to make it look or feel good! You need a professional to make all of this work.

The threat, of course, is that many will be satisfied with capturing “good enough” media artifacts, which is where our field will be affected the most. The scary thing for us, however, is that many of you will take exactly this stance — which is likely to cause many media professionals to go out of business. This is precisely why departments of communication cannot afford to produce anything other than what is outstanding.

In sum, whenever a new technology is introduced in any system, that system is then changed forever because of that technology infusion.

Today, smartphone technology is having a major impact on our field of communication, due to the democratization of the device. Tomorrow, your field will be affected by it.

It is coming! The question: What are you doing to prepare for it?

The TechnoModeration Manifesto

The TechnoModeration Manifesto

Use technology but in moderation…

If you like technology too much learn to unlike it a bit. Get away from computerized devices to move more, help people, help yourself, celebrate others, exercise, go to church, go on a date, and read a book. Play, laugh, smile, enjoy, make it happen, and don’t forget to disconnect in the process. Do it now not tomorrow. Give yourself permission to be in control of your computerized devices use. Don’t be a slave to your smartphone. Converse and build relationships that last off-line and make friends not on-line followers. I dare you to control your life not technology. Focus, be alert, think, reflect and act. Be the change you want to see in others. Be in control of you and never, under any circumstances, let technology dictate how you live. After all, you are a son or daughter of God not an object to be plugged in a wall somewhere.

Live.

Why I Turn Off My Phone Four Times A Day

Why I Turn Off My Phone Four Times A Day

I turn off my phone four times a day. Let me tell you. I’m glad I do It and you should, as well. Why do I turn off my iPhone four times a day? Because I want to live the best life I possibly can.

I turn off my device before I leave the house in the morning to work, during my lunch hour, and after supper for about an hour and before I go to sleep.

There is no reason to have your device on 24/7. By giving your smartphone a break you give yourself a break, as well! Don’t wait until tomorrow to get a break from your smartphone today, I say.

It pays off to disconnect and as a value added, you can do so many things with your extra time. These are some of the things that I now do because I turn off my phone for times a day.

1. Exercise. I now exercise three times a week for an hour. The result: My blood pressure is lower and I lost 5 pounds already.

2. Go for a walk. My wife and I go for a walk at least one a week and we love it. We are now closer than ever.

3. Read a book. I found Seth Godin’s work by disconnecting! Love this. It has changed the way I see modern day marketing.

4. Rest. It is good to be at home and literally not be doing anything. Turning off your phone helps you to recharge your energy and that’s a necessity for anyone who wants to live a good life.

5. Master the art of timing. I now have time to critically think about those who matter to me and introduce ideas to my tribe, accordingly.

Moral of the story. Turn off your smartphone tomorrow. Four times throughout the day. Not just once or none. Give yourself the much needed time to recharge and live the life you deserve.

You won’t regret it.