The Purple Cow Is For Real

The Purple Cow Is For Real

During this past year, I’ve been engaging with college students, face-to-face, in a very different way — Dancing latin music on campus with them, skateboarding with some, singing karaoke with others, attending their rock concert events and playing guitar with many around campus. These former activities aren’t usually done by many college professors across the United States and I know it. That’s exactly the point! I’m the purple cow around here. I decided to make my brand remarkable.

Seth Godin, back in the day, introduced the concept of the purple cow, which literally means that in an market of abundance, much like the one that we are living right now in the United States, people need to be the only option available to their audiences because of the amount of noise/supply that there is on the market these days.

By being different, or shall we say eccentric, I’m finding out by students that many students perceive me as animated and fun to be around but more importantly… that no other professor behave the way I do. Ladies and gents, I’m the purple cow and I love it.

Attention is a currency as Gary Vaynerchuck once said. I agree with him. Leveraging this “attention,” whatever the method, often results in people/brands growing in their popularity and influence among their real target audience. Some may think that my approach is juvenile or too over the top but the reality is that it works.  How do I know this? I take a very close look at my social media analytics in order to test a working hypothesis on the topic.

Since early October 2019, my instagram account alone has grown 300%, after I literally met 300 students dancing merengue on campus. Of these 300 hundred, 30 of those decided to follow my account on TikTok, and many others my account on facebook. My office visitations doubled this semester, as well as the conversations I now have in my own building with them. Off-line communication is a must if you decided to be a purple cow in your own organization.

I cannot go to lunch at the cafeteria without a random student screaming, “Dr. A!”

In sum, The concept of the purple cow is for real. If you make yourself worth of making a remark about, AKA being the purple cow… you will grow and audience. Read Seth Godin’s work and apply his concepts if you want to grow a brand.

You won’t regret.

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Create Like An Optimist. Spend Like A Pessimist…

Create Like An Optimist. Spend Like A Pessimist…

Create like an optimist. Spend like a pessimist… Seth Godin once said. As you know by now, I’m a Seth Godin fan because he thinks critically about facts and concepts that are applicable to our daily lives. In an age where distribution has been commoditized, it only makes sense for us to create art if you think about it. Putting our brains to work makes a lot of sense to me especially because the cost for delivering art to s viable market is often free of charge. As a caveat, spending our income wisely or shall we say, with much pessimism if you please, seems right to me because it allows us to produce more art overtime.

I don’t foresee a decrease in art creation for public art consumption in the near future simply because we can produce artifacts with ease and because of the unevenly distributed global wealth calls that exists worldwide today. Let’s not forget that the art market has grown to 67.3 billion in 2017, making art a massive industry in the global economy. God figure! As Seth, would say, what we do is art. I say… We live for art since art is what we should create. We are creating beings, ladies and gents.

You can make a career in art.

At the same time we create, we should save… Or spend like a pessimist! Saving our funds enable us to create even more art, which is de facto the ideal these days according to Seth and other critical thinkers. It is tough to create art en masse without food in your bellies.

What Elon Musk produces is art. What Apple delivers is art. Our work outputs are artifacts… What we do is art, as Seth would say. I agree.

Let’s create like an optimist and spend like a pessimist. We are creative beings that were born to make art. When we spend our monies responsibly, creating more art becomes much easier which in turn results in more creative output.

What have you created lately? Are you spending your income wisely?

 

 

 

 

Fame Breeds Trust These Days

Fame Breeds Trust These Days

According to Seth Godin, one of my favorite authors, trust is at the center of what makes a person sell a product to a particular market. In the United States, as he emphasizes, trust (for now) equates to fame for many. I think that Seth is right about this, as long as trust is defined by the people a “famous” person has on their side.

To Obama fans, Obama is trustworthy. Trump fans find him trustworthy. Putin is probably trustworthy among the people he serves. Now, all of these three leaders were famous before they were trustworthy. Obama didn’t become trustworthy on-line without fame off-line. The same goes to Trump, Putin or any other TV celebrity with millions of followers on instagram out there.  I dare to say that every recent big account on twitter was started by someone who already had some clout off-line (fame) which allowed them to be “trustworthy” on-line which resulted in them having engagement rates at ridiculous levels on a daily basis. Today, having trust equates to sales, or being elected, and so on.

No wonder why Kim Kardashian is able to sell so much merchandise. Her fame off-line allowed her to be a trusted choice for the people she serves on-line. She was Paris Hilton’s friend who probably made her “famous” by introducing her to her network which eventually turned Kim into a trustworthy brand for a group. Without off-line fame (or connections), at least in the United States today, it is very tough for anyone to build a millionaire business that deals with the public, I bet.

Reality…

I wrote over ninety columns for the Cleveland Daily Banner, here in town for about a year. There is no doubt that I became a famous local personality in this small city we call Cleveland, Tennessee, to some. How do I know this? Because people were constantly stopping me in the grocery store, gas stations, WalMart… making comments like, “Aren’t you the guy who writes for the newspaper?” “Man, I love your column!” “Would you like to come speak in our club about technology?”

The fact that my face was in one of my community’s main news outlets gave me tremendous trust in this community to a point of being invited to speak at the local Rotary Club, Civitan, United Way, WTNB, and two TV stations in Chattanooga. Think about this logic for a minute — “If Luis is writing for the Banner and people are talking about him so much in the community (fame), he therefore must be trustworthy (trust). Maybe we should bring him to our club to speak (sale).

I kind of knew this logic before through observation. Now that Seth has written about fame preceding trust in his latest book, “This is Marketing,” I’m convinced that anyone who threatens your path to “fame” (definitions may vary, of course), threatens your ability to be trusted and consequently sell whatever you offer to a viable market regardless of intentionality. More than ever, we need to pay attention to the former because appearances do matter these days.    

We live in a weird global economy where people’s fame gives them a certain level of trust. The edge of trust. At least, this is the reality in the United States, according to Seth Godin. Trust is at the center of what makes a person sell a product to a particular market. Fortunate will be those who position themselves to build “fame” in order to build trust, if their goal is to sell something to an audience. It is goofy but if Seth said so, I bet it is.

Are you a famous person to a particular group? If you are, I bet they trust you or your brand and being “famous” had something to do with it. If you are not famous, I suggest that you become “famous” to somebody if your goal is to sell a product or service. We live in a shallow world in America these days where appearance of “fame” seems to matter more than ever in sales. It is odd, I know and agree.

Are you famous? Who is trusting you? You may want to know the answer to the former questions. It may be the difference between you selling yourself (or something) to an audience these days or not.

Take note, ladies and gents.