What Builds Trust Is Genuine Generosity

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In the connection economy, trust is the fuel that helps us to build our modern networks. Just because a cake may appear to be smaller when we share it with others doesn’t mean that we should stop being generous and stop sharing. We still live in an age where a person who is generous builds trust, despite the fact that the internet is taking over. The genuine act of sharing and sacrificing for other people’s sake usually goes a long way and helps others to reconstruct their own narratives about themselves.

Building trust is a commodity that is worth pursuing, especially in social media.  In today’s economic landscape, it’s not who you know but how trustworthy you are and who you have access to. Being genuine and generous pays off.

The network effect is real — A product or service will gain additional value as more people use it. If the former is true, it only makes sense for social media personalities to be generous and invest in community building without putting emphasis on the self as people are less likely to adopt innovations that are essentially self-centered in nature. 

I’m convinced that engaging in the selfish act of producing lots of social media output, with the pretense of “giving content for free,” is immature and dangerous. Trust is rarely built this way. Most people can spot fake generosity.

By being genuinely generous with others, people build the trust that is required to build long lasting networks. The act of giving with the expectation of getting something in return isn’t what I call genuinely generous and is likely to decrease long term trust. Giving to others with “strings attached” is an element of hustling. People hate to be hustled. Genuine generosity is when we give without expecting to gain anything in return. It is generosity for generosity’s sake.

Listen carefully: In 2019, genuine generosity is a currency. Much attention will be gained by genuinely giving to others. Fortunate will be the ones who understand that.